Accessible Housing Call Answered

There is a need for accessible housing around the Minneapolis and St. Paul area. Many of the current standing condos […]

There is a need for accessible housing around the Minneapolis and St. Paul area. Many of the current standing condos and apartments are in older buildings that do not meet accessibility needs. So where can one find a decent place to live if they want to be in or near a neighborhood that does not currently have an abundance of accessible housing?

New developments are the answer. Throughout Minneapolis and St. Paul there are a large number of new developments going up that support completely accessible living. Because of grants received from government agencies, these units are also very affordable.

One such project is located at 201 W. 31st Street, Minneapolis. Prima Land Inc., Nonprofit Development Corp, and Lyndale Neighborhood Development Corp. have built a 2 bedroom, 1 bath Condo with approximately 1400 sq. ft. of livable area. The Condo comes with a side by side washer and dryer, dish washer, refrigerator, microwave, stove, garbage disposal, 1 car attached garage, and has a security system that is pre-paid for 1 year. Another advantage of this development is that it is part of a Condominium Association. That means that all the pesky tasks such as yard work and snow removal are taken care of by the association, leaving you, the homeowner, more time to do the things you enjoy. Living in an association also means that there are more units very close by that parents or caretakers could move into.

These types of condos and similar apartments are being built all around the twin cities. It seems as though the call for good accessible housing has been heard and is beginning to be answered. The next step is to let developers know if you are interested in buying. If no one comes foreword, the developers are likely to stop building these types of units because they cannot successfully market and sell them. With interest rates as low as they are, now is a great time to buy. This writer would encourage you to talk to a developer and communicate your housing desires. Hopefully, both parties involved will prosper and we can continue to build strong diverse neighborhoods.

Editor’s note: This article was paid for by Prima Land Inc.

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