Deafblind Web Site

Helen Keller is a household name.  But do you know about. . . Laura Bridgman, Danny Delcambre, or your elderly neighbor? . . . The modern technology and communication methods deafblind people use in daily life? . . . Where to find information and assistance if you experience vision and hearing loss?

The general public has little knowledge about what it is like to be deafblind.  People who are deafblind themselves have limited access to sights, sounds, and information.  A new Web site, www.DeafBlindinfo.org, is designed to close the information gap for both populations.

This site showcases a vast collection of deafblindness information and resources in Minnesota and from around the world.  Its Consumer Resource Guides aim to inform and empower adults, youth, families and senior citizens with dual sensory impairment.

Adrienne Haugen is one of several deafblind Minnesotans who provided feedback during the development of DeafBlindinfo.org.  Haugen noted, “Everything’s all in one place and it’s WONDERFUL to see this Web site providing so much information that is necessary for every deafblind [person] to know about.”

The site was developed with periodic input from DeafBlind consumers and parents of deafblind children, and was funded by a grant from the Minnesota Department of Human Services—Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services Division.

What You Will Find

  1. A “Frequently Asked Questions” section that is particularly helpful in learning about deafblindness.  [Editor’s note:  For example, I checked out FAQ #8 to help me understand why DeafBlind is capitalized in certain instances and not in others.]
  2. A vast collection of information on a wide range of topics, such as identification of a dual sensory impairment, language development for deafblind children, disability laws and advocacy resources, technology aids for vision and hearing loss, and more.
  3. Consumer Resource Guides specially designed for people experiencing combined vision and hearing loss:
    •  
      • Adults
      • Transition-age youth
      • Parents and families
      • Senior citizens
  4. Links to deafblindness-related resources in Minnesota, other states, across the nation and around the world.

Make Deafblindness Information Accessible

Please share this announcement with your consumers and colleagues.  The more sites that link to DeafBlindinfo.org, the easier it will be for people to find deafblindness information and resources—both on our site and on yours.  Click on “Link to Us” at the bottom of any page of the site for instructions.

Marisa Bennett, DeafBlindinfo.org webmaster, has over thirteen years experience working with deaf, deafblind, and blind children and adults—and lives with several invisible disabilities herself.