Radio Talking Book - March 2014

New signal coverage in Hinckley area

If you are one of the many people living in east-central Minnesota, halfway between the Twin Cities and Duluth, you may have experienced difficulty getting the Radio Talking Book signal clearly. That has now changed. In early February, our Engineering staff and Minnesota Public Radio installed new equipment in the Hinckley area that should fill that gap.

 

A reminder about the Brainerd Newspaper on Dial-in-News

In case you missed it last month, this is a reminder that the Brainerd Dispatch was added recently to Dial-In News. Dial-In News is a free service through which people can access all the articles of the newspaper via a touch-tone telephone. You can register for Dial-In News by calling either 651-642-0885 or 651-539-1424.

 

Weekend Program Books

Your Personal World (Saturday at 1 p.m.) is airing The Slow Fix, by Carl Honore, and Ten Years Later, by Hoda Kotb; For the Younger Set (Sunday at 11 a.m.) is airing Shadow on the Mountain, by Margi Preus, and The Elites: Privileged Positions, by Emily Flint and Quinn Xi; Poetic Reflections (Sunday at noon) is airing The Earth Avails, by Mark Wunderlich, and The Exchange, by Sophie Cabot Black; The U.S. and Us (Sunday at 4 p.m.) is airing Black White Blue, by William Swanson, and Augie’s Secrets, by Neal Karlen.

 

Books Available Through Faribault

Books broadcast on the Minnesota Radio Talking Book Network are available through the Minnesota  Braille and Talking Book Library in Faribault, MN. Their phone is 1-800-722-0550 and hours are 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday. Their catalog is also online, and you can access it by going to the main website, www.mnbtbl.org, and then clicking on the link Search the Library Catalog. If you live outside of Minnesota, you may obtain copies of our books via an inter-library loan by contacting your own state’s Network Library for the National Library Service.

Listen to the Minnesota Radio Talking Book, either live or archived programs from the last week, on the Internet at www.mnssb.org/rtb. Call the staff at the Radio for your password to the site.

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Chautauqua Tuesday – Saturday 4 a.m

Zealot, Nonfiction by Reza Aslan, 2014. 8 Br. Began March 6. Sifting through centuries of myths, Reza Aslan sheds light on one of history’s most influential and enigmatic people by examining Jesus through the lens of the tumultuous era in which he lived, an age of great apocalyptic fervor.  Read by June Prange.

 

 

Past is Prologue Monday – Friday 9 a.m.

Book of Ages, Nonfiction by Jill Lepore, 2013. 10 Br. Began March 4. Benjamin Franklin was able to forge a path to greatness from obscure beginnings, while his beloved sister Jane, trapped by gender and starved of education, was not. They seemed so different from each other but were also so connected.  Read by Esmé Evans.

Cooked, Nonfiction by Michael Pollan, 2013. 16 Br. Begins March 18. The four classical elements, fire, water, air, and earth, transform the stuff of nature into delicious things to eat and drink. Michael Pollan writes of these but also of how cooking involves us in a web of social and ecological relationships. Relying on corporations to process our food means we consume large quantities of fat, sugar, and salt; disrupt our link to the natural world; and weaken our relationships with family and friends. Read by Myrna Smith.

 

Bookworm Monday – Friday 11 a.m.

Children of Liberty, Fiction by Paullina Simons, 2013. 14 Br. Begins March 11. Gina Attaviano travels from Sicily to Boston to start a new life. She meets Harry Barrington, son of one of New England’s most successful businessmen, and the attraction is in spite of their families’ opposition. S – Read by Laura Rohlik.

Muckers, Fiction by Sandra Neil Wallace, 2013. 9 Br. Begins March 31. A lot is riding on Red O’Sullivan’s scrawny shoulders: the football season, his family’s legacy, maybe the entire identity of the town. Their Arizona mining town has been clinging to the side of the mountain but all the copper veins are used up. L – Read by Phil Rosenbaum.

 

 

 

The Writer’s Voice, Monday – Friday 2 p.m.

Walking with Jack, Nonfiction by Don J. Snyder, 2013. 11 Br. Begins March 10. Snyder never wanted to lose Jack the way Snyder’s father had lost him. They pledged that no matter what happened, Jack would become a pro golfer someday, and Snyder would be his caddie. Read by Jim Gregorich.

The Unseen Trail, Nonfiction by Michael O. Hanson, 2013. 6 Br. Begins March 25. Using a GPS device and trekking poles, Hanson, who is blind, plotted and completed the majority of the Appalachian Trail without outside assistance, showing the power of technology and independence for those without sight. Read by Mike Piscitelli.

 

 

 

Choice Reading, Monday – Friday 4 p.m.

The Silver Star, Fiction by Jeannette Walls, 2013. 8 Br. Began March 5. Liz and Bean are left to fend for themselves when their mother leaves to find herself. They take a bus to Virginia to where their uncle lives to start a new life. Read by Isla Hejny.

The Supremes at Earl’s All-You-Can-Eat, Fiction by Edward Kelsey Moore, 2013. 12 Br. Begins March 17. Earl’s All-You-Can-Eat is home away from home for these women, dubbed “the Supremes” by high school pals in the 1960s. Over the next four decades, they weather life’s storms together. L – Read by Natasha DeVoe.

 

 

PM Report, Monday – Friday 8 p.m.

Who Owns the Future?, Nonfiction by Jaron Lanier, 2013. 14 Br. Begins March 4. Jaron Lanier asserts that the rise of digital networks led our economy into recession and decimated the middle class. Now, as technology flattens more and more industries, we are facing even greater challenges to employment and personal wealth. Read by Marylyn Burridge.

Exit the Colonel, Nonfiction by Ethan Chorin, 2013. 15 Br. Begins March 24. After years of aggression and isolation, Libya got an unexpected lifeline – the rise of al Qaeda and the war in Iraq turned Libya into an ally. But Gaddafi’s feints toward reform engendered a movement that was too powerful to put down. Read by John Demma.

 

 

Night Journey, Monday – Friday 9 p.m.

W Is for Wasted, Fiction by Sue Grafton, 2013. 16 Br. Begins March 3. Two deaths changed the course of Kinsey Millhone’s life that fall: one a murder of a PI, the other a homeless man who died of natural causes. But the homeless man had her number in his pants pocket and digging deeper, the two deaths seem connected. L – Read by Nancy Felknor.

Accused, Fiction by Lisa Scottoline, 2013. 11 Br. Begins March 25. When thirteen-year-old Allegra walks into Rosato & Associates alone seeking representation to free a man she believes was wrongly convicted of her sister’s murder, Mary DiNunzio is compelled to help.  L – Read by Janelle Mattson.

 

 

Off the Shelf, Monday – Friday 10 p.m.

The Son, Fiction by Philipp Meyer, 2013. 23 Br. Began February 19. When Eli is captured by the Comanches, he adapts and lives as they do. But when the tribe is decimated, he finds himself alone without an identity. V,L,S – Read by Jack Rossmann.

When She Came Home, Fiction by Drusilla Campbell, 2013. 7 Br. Begins March 24. Frankie Byrne Tennyson stunned everyone when she decided to enlist in the Marine Corps. Now she is home from serving in Iraq, but the home she returns to is full of challenges. However, the greatest challenge lies within herself. L – Read by Jenny O’Brien.

 

 

Potpourri, Monday – Friday 11 p.m.    

Worldly Philosopher, Nonfiction by Jeremy Adelman, 2013. 29 Br. Began February 25. Born in 1915, Hirschman was one of the twentieth century’s most original and provocative thinkers. Read by Leila Poullada

 

 

Good Night Owl, Monday – Friday midnight

The Twelve, Fiction by Justin Cronin, 2013. 29 Br. Begins March 11. In the present day, living in a man-made apocalypse, three people learn that in connection lies hope. One hundred years in the future, people fight for humankind’s salvation, unaware that the rules have changed. L – Read by Bob Malos.

 

 

After Midnight, Tuesday – Saturday 1 a.m.

Unpredictable Webs, Fiction by Darlene Quinn, 2013. 14 Br. Began March 7. About to turn sixteen, Marnie is rebellious and jealous of her more even-tempered and popular twin sister. Marnie finds a listener in Brad, whom she meets online, and arranges an in-person meet-up with him. Too late, she realizes she’s been targeted. L – Read by Mary Hall.         

The Tell, Fiction by Hester Kaplan, 2013. 11 Br. Begins March 27. Mira and Owen’s marriage is tested when Wilton Deere, an aging former TV star, moves into the grand house next door. With plenty of money and time to kill, Wilton is charming but ruthless as he inserts himself into the couple’s life. L – Read by Carol Lewis.

 

 

Abbreviations: V – violence, L – offensive language, S – sexual situations