Stay updated on COVID-19 vaccines, take advantage of telehealth

When was your last COVID-19 vaccine? When should you get another?   Adults ages 65 years and older should receive an […]

COVID-19 vaccine viles

When was your last COVID-19 vaccine? When should you get another?  

Adults ages 65 years and older should receive an additional updated 2023-2024 COVID-19 vaccine dose, according to the federal Centers of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The recommendation acknowledges the increased risk of severe disease from COVID-19 in older adults, along with the currently available data on vaccine effectiveness. 

Previous CDC recommendations ensured that people who are immunocompromised are already eligible for additional doses of the  COVID-19 vaccine. Many people with disabilities have compromised immune systems. 

CDC Director Mandy Cohen has endorsed the CDC Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices’ recommendation for the vaccine. Data continues to show the importance of vaccination to protect those most at risk for severe outcomes of COVID-19. An additional dose of the updated COVID-19 vaccine may restore protection that has waned since a fall vaccine dose, providing increased protection to adults ages 65 years and older. 

Adults 65 years and older are disproportionately impacted by COVID-19, with more than half of COVID-19 hospitalizations during October 2023 to December 2023 occurring in this age group. 

The CDC and the committee will continue to monitor COVID-19 vaccine safety and effectiveness. CDC continues to recommend that everyone stay up to date on their COVID-19 vaccines, especially people with weakened immune systems. 

Cohen said, “Most COVID-19 deaths and hospitalizations last year were among people 65 years and older. An additional vaccine dose can provide added protection that may have decreased over time for those at highest risk.” 

Get help quickly 

The landscape of COVID-19 has changed over time. Some health insurers are requiring co-pays for vaccines. Free tests are largely a thing of the past. But there are still free or low-cost resources. 

State health officials work with Cue Health to provide faster access to Paxlovid in many cases. Paxlovid is an anti-viral treatment that can provide relief in many cases.

Minnesota has a Test-to-Treat-Telehealth Program. 

Because many people are not tasking advantage of updated vaccines that combat new variants, and because clinics are often crowded, the telehealth program is an option for people seeking treatment when they do become ill.  Paxlovid may not help everyone. It is typically only prescribed to adults. But it is very effective. One clinical trial found an 89 percent reduction in symptoms. But it and any other antiviral medications have a short window of time in which they can be used. 

If someone is unable to pay for medication the PAXCESS Program can help. Learn more at paxlovid.com/paxcess 

 Learn more about telehealth and COVID-19 at care.cuehealth.com/mn 

  • Struggling with Long COVID? Get support. Talk to your healthcare provider.
  • Struggling with Long COVID? Get support. Talk to your healthcare provider.


DON'T LOSE IT! • Keep your Medical Assistance or MinnesotaCare active • Fill out and return your renewal forms Watch your mail and go online NOW
EXPERT SEXUAL HEALTH CARE. IT'S WHAT WE DO. SCHEDULE ONLINE.