The Governors decide to wait. . .

Governor Arne Carlson’s office explains his role at the National Governors Association meeting in Seattle, Washington: During final debate over […]

Governor Arne Carlson’s office explains his role at the National Governors Association meeting in Seattle, Washington:

During final debate over health care policy by the nation’s governors, Minnesota Governor Arnie Carlson said the federal government must work with the states to allow them to be innovative and flexible.

“We in Minnesota are on the cutting edge of this issue,” Carlson said, citing the Minnesota Children’s Health Plan, which has been recognized by the National Governors Association as a successful model.

Health care has been the primary focus of the National Governors Association meeting in Seattle, Washington.

Carlson praised the overall thrust of the health care policy adopted by the governors, one aspect of which urges the federal government to streamline the process for obtaining waivers so that states can develop their own innovative programs.

“All of the governors recognize the need to make health care affordable to all Americans, and we all agree that the system must be cost-effective,” Carlson said.  “But there is no consensus yet on the solution.  There is no one solution.”

Much of the debate centered on a proposal to impose a January 1, 1994, deadline to create a new federal health care system.  Governor Carlson told his fellow governors that pressing for federal health care solution by 1994 could result in more burdensome mandates for the states, with no funding or flexibility.

Governor Carlson said that it is important that “the federal government allow states to be creative in designing their own solutions.”

The governors defeated the proposal to add the 1994 deadline, and instead adopted a resolution urging that “Congress and the President shall immediately begin working with the governors to achieve a comprehensive and cost-effective health care system.”